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Landmark Agreement Moves 757 Species Toward Federal Protection


On July 12, 2011, the Center for Biological Diversity struck a historic legal settlement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, requiring the agency to make initial or final decisions on whether to add hundreds of imperiled plants and animals to the endangered species list by 2018. The Endangered Species Act is America’s strongest environmental law and surest way to save species threatened with extinction.

By now many more than 100 species have won final Endangered Species Act protections through this settlement, which was signed and approved by a federal judge on September 9, 2011. Just a few of these hundred are the Miami blue butterflyCasey’s June beetle; Ozark hellbender; Florida semaphore cactus; northern Mexican garter snake; Oregon spotted frog; and 23 Oahu species, which also earned 42,804 acres of critical habitat. The Service has also proposed protection for the yellow-billed cuckooMexican gray wolf, Dakota skipper, Gunnison sage-grouse, Mono Basin sage grouse, and red knot.

The settlement caps a decade-long effort by the Center’s scientists, attorneys and activists to safeguard 1,000 of America’s most imperiled, least protected species including the walrus, wolverine, Mexican gray wolf, fisher, New England cottontail rabbit, three species of sage grouse, scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper, California golden trout, Miami blue butterfly, Rio Grande cutthroat trout, 403 southeastern river-dependent species, 42 Great Basin springsnails and 32 Pacific Northwest mollusks.

The Center has written scientific petitions and/or filed lawsuits to win federal protection for each of the 757 species.

Click to see the species in alphabetical order, by year of their protection decision, by taxon or via an interactive state-by-state map.

Here are a few highlights:

 
 

Black-footed albatross: A large, dark-plumed seabird that lives in northwestern Hawaii, the black-footed albatross is threatened by longline swordfish fisheries, which kill it as bycatch.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list this albatross as an endangered species in 2004. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection, determine it does not qualify, or find that it is warranted but precluded for protection in 2011.

 

Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper ('i’iwi): This bright-red bird hovers like a hummingbird and has long been featured in the folklore and songs of native Hawaiians. It is threatened by climate change, which is causing mosquitoes that carry introduced diseases — including avian pox and malaria — to move into the honeycreeper’s higher-elevations refuges. It has been eliminated from low elevations on all islands by these diseases.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2010. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2016 and finalize the decision in 2017 if warranted.

 

Greater and Mono Basin sage grouse: Sage grouse are showy, ground-dwelling birds that perform elaborate mating dances, with males puffing up giant air sacks on their chests. The Mono Basin sage grouse lives in Nevada and California. The greater sage grouse lives throughout much of the Interior West. Both are threatened by oil and gas drilling, livestock grazing, development and off-road vehicles.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list the Mono Basin sage grouse as an endangered species in 2005. It was placed on the candidate list in 2010. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2013 and finalize the decision in 2014 if warranted.

The greater sage grouse was petitioned for listing in 2002 and placed on the candidate list in 2010. Under our agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2015 and finalize the decision in 2016 if warranted.

 

Mexican gray wolf: Exterminated from, then reintroduced to the Southwest, the Mexican gray wolf lives in remote forests and mountains along the Arizona/New Mexico border. It is threatened by legal and illegal killing, which has hampered the federal recovery program, keeping the species down to 50 wild animals.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list it as an endangered species separate from other wolves in 2009. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2012 and finalize the decision in 2013 if warranted.

 

Pacific fisher: A cat-like relative of minks and otters, the fisher is the only animal that regularly preys on porcupines. It lives in old-growth forests in California, Oregon and Washington, where it is threatened by logging.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list the fisher as an endangered species in 2000. It was placed on the candidate list in 2004. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2014 and finalize the decision in 2015 if warranted.

 

Miami blue butterfly: An ethereal beauty native to South Florida and possibly the most endangered insect in the United States, the Miami blue was thought extinct after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 but rediscovered in 1999. It is threatened by habitat loss and pesticide spraying.

It was petitioned for listing as an endangered species in 2000 and placed on the candidate list in 2005. The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it on an emergency basis in 2011. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2012 and finalize the decision in 2013 if warranted.

 

Oregon spotted frog: The Oregon spotted frog lives in wetlands from southernmost British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to northernmost California. It is threatened by habitat destruction and exotic species.

The Oregon spotted frog was placed on the candidate in 1991. The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2004. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2013 and finalize the decision in 2014 if warranted.

 

Pacific walrus: A large, ice-loving, tusk-bearing pinniped, the Pacific walrus plays a major role in the culture and religion of many northern peoples. Like the polar bear, it is threatened by the rapid and accelerating loss of Arctic sea ice and oil drilling.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2007. It was placed on the candidate list in 2011. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2017 and finalize the decision in 2018 if warranted.

 

Rio Grande cutthroat trout: Characterized by deep crimson slashes on its throat — hence the name “cutthroat” — the Rio Grande cutthroat is New Mexico’s state fish. It formerly occurred throughout high-elevation streams in the Rio Grande Basin of New Mexico and southern Colorado. Logging, road building, grazing, pollution and exotic species have pushed it to the brink of extinction.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 1998. It was placed on the candidate list in 2008. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2014 and finalize the decision in 2015 if warranted.

 

403 Southeast aquatic species: The southeastern United States contains the richest aquatic biodiversity in the nation, harboring 62 percent of the country’s fish species (493 species), 91 percent of its mussels (269 species) and 48 percent of its dragonflies and damselflies (241 species). Unfortunately, the wholesale destruction, diversion, pollution and development of the Southeast’s rivers have made the region America’s aquatic extinction capital.

In 2010, the Center for Biological Diversity completed a 1,145-page, peer-reviewed petition to list 403 Southeast aquatic species as endangered, including the Florida sandhill crane, MacGillivray's seaside sparrow, Alabama map turtle, Oklahoma salamander, West Virginia spring salamander, Tennessee cave salamander, Black warrior waterdog, Cape Sable orchid, Clam-shell orchid, Florida bog frog, Lower Florida Keys striped mud turtle, Eastern black rail, and Streamside salamander.

None of the Southeast aquatic species are on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to issue initial listing decisions on all 403 plants and animals in 2011.

 

42 Great Basin springsnails: Living in isolated springs of the Great Basin and Mojave deserts, springsnails play important ecological roles cycling nutrients, filtering water and providing food to other animals. Many are threatened by a Southern Nevada Water Authority plan to pump remote, desert groundwater to Las Vegas.

In 2009, the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list 42 springsnails as endangered species, including the duckwater pyrg, Big Warm Spring pyrg and Moapa pebblesnail. None are on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to issue initial listing decisions on all 42 species in 2011.

 

32 Pacific Northwest mollusks: The Pacific Northwest is home to a unique diversity of mollusks found nowhere else on Earth. With colorful names like the evening fieldslug, cinnamon juga, Chelan mountainsnail and masked duskysnail, these species recycle nutrients, filter water and provide important prey for birds, amphibians and other animals. Many species threatened by logging, pollution and urban sprawl.

In 2008, the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list 32 Washington, Oregon and Northern California mollusks as endangered species. None are on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was slated to issue initial listing decisions on all 32 species in 2011.

 


Skip to species list for decision year:
2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

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Timeline of Required Species Protection Decisions

2011
Initial Decision:Florida sandhill crane, MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, eastern black rail, Alabama map turtle, Oklahoma salamander, Barbour’s map turtle, Escambia map turtle, West Virginia spring salamander, Tennessee cave salamander, Black Warrior waterdog, Cape Sable orchid, clam-shell orchid, Florida bog frog, Lower Florida Keys striped mud turtle, streamside salamander, Chamberlain’s dwarf salamander, cobblestone tiger beetle, Carolina pygmy sunfish, Tippecanoe darter, eastern hellbender, acute elimia, Alabama cave crayfish, Alabama hickorynut, Alabama rainbow, Alabama spike, Alachua light-fleeing cave crayfish, Altamaha arcmussel, Altamaha shiner, Amargosa tryonia, ample elimia, angular dwarf crayfish, Apalachicola floater, Apalachicola wild indigo, Appalachian cave crayfish, Appalachian fissidens moss, Appalachian snaketail, Arkansas mudalia, Ash Meadows pebblesnail, ashy darter, Atlantic pigtoe, Avernus cave beetle, bankhead darter, Barrens darter, Barrens topminnow, basalt juga, Bayou Bodcau crayfish, bear tupelo, bearded red crayfish, beautiful crayfish, beaverpond marstonia, bifid duct pyrg, Big Bar Hesperian, Big Blue Springs cave crayfish, Big Cypress epidendrum, Big Sandy crayfish, Big South Fork crayfish, Big Warm Spring pyrg, Bigcheek cave crayfish, Black Creek crayfish, black mudalia, blackbarred crayfish, black-bract pipewort, blackfin sucker, black-knobbed map turtle, Blood River crayfish, Blue Point pyrg, Blue Spring hydrobe snail, bluehead shiner, Blueridge springfly, bluestripe shiner, bog spicebush, Boykin’s lobelia, Brawleys Fork crayfish, bridled darter, Broad River burrowing crayfish, Broad River spiney crayfish, broadstripe shiner, brook floater, brother spike, Bryson’s sedge, Burrington jumping slug, burrowing bog crayfish, Butterfield pyrg, Caddo madtom, caddisfly (Agarodes logani), Calcasieu crayfish, Calvert’s emerald, Camp Valley pyrg, canary duskysnail, candy darter, Canoe Creek pigtoe, Cape Fear spatterdock, caper elimia, Carolina birds-in-a-nest, Carolina bishopweed, Carolina hemlock, Carolina madtom, cave obligate isopod (Caecidotea cannula), Chattooga River crayfish, Chauga crayfish, Chelan mountainsnail, Cherokee clubtail, Chesapeake logperch, Chickamauga crayfish, Choctaw bean, Chowanoke crayfish, ciliate-leaf tickseed, cinnamon juga, Clifton Spring hydrobe snail, coal darter, coastal flatwoods crayfish, coastal lowland cave crayfish, cobble elimia, cockle elimia, coldwater crayfish, Coleman cave beetle, Columbia duskysnail, Columbia Oregonian, compact elimia, Conasauga blue burrower, Cooper’s cave amphipod, Coosa creekshell, Coosawattae crayfish, Corn Creek pyrg, corpulent hornsnail, Correll’s false dragonhead, Crater Lake tightcoil, crested riverlet crayfish, Crossroads cave beetle, crystal darter, crystal springsnail, Cumberland dusky salamander, Cumberland Gap cave beetle, Cumberland moccasinshell, Curtis’ loosestrife, cylinder elimia, cypress crayfish, Dalles sideband, delicate spike, dense hydrobe snail, diminutive pebblesnail, disjunct pebblesnail, distal gland springsnail, doll’s daisy, domed ancylid, Dougherty Plain cave crayfish, Dry Fork Valley cave beetle, Duckwater pyrg, Duckwater Warm Springs pyrg, Dukes’ skipper, eared coneflower, eastern ribbonsnake - Lower Florida Keys, Edison’s ascyrum, Edmund’s snaketail, egg-mimic darter, elegant elimia, Elk River crayfish, Elliott’s croton, elongate gland springsnail, emigrant pyrg, engraved elimia, Enterprise siltsnail, Etowah crayfish, evening fieldslug, Fairbanks springsnail, flag pyrg, flat-top pebblesnail, flat-topped steptoe pyrg, Florida brown checkered summer sedge, Florida cave amphipod, Florida cave crayfish, Florida fairy shrimp, Florida Keys mole Skink, Florida pondweed, Florida red-bellied turtle - Florida Panhandle, Florida willow, frecklebelly madtom, Freemouth hydrobe snail, fuzzy pigtoe, Georgia blind salamander, Georgia leadplant, globular pebblesnail, Godfrey’s privet, Godfrey’s stitchwort, gorge leafy liverwort, Grandfather Mountain crayfish, grated tryonia, green floater, Greenbrier cave crayfish, Greensboro burrowing crayfish, Gulf Hammock dwarf siren, Gulf sweet pitcherplant, hairy-peduncled beakrush, Halloween darter, Hall’s bulrush, Hall’s pocket moss, Hamlin Valley pyrg, Hardin crayfish, hardy pyrg, Harper’s fimbristylis, Harper’s heartleaf, Hartwrightia, Hatchie burrowing crayfish, helmet rocksnail, Henry’s spider-lily, Hiwassee Headwater crayfish, Hobb’s cave amphipod, Hoko vertigo, holiday darter, hornwort (Megaceros aenigmaticus), Hubbard’s cave beetle, Hubbs pyrg, Hubricht’s cave beetle, Ichetucknee siltsnail, impressed-nerved sedge, inflated floater, inflated spike, insular cotton rat, Irons Fork burrowing crayfish, Jackson Prairie crayfish, Jefferson County crayfish, karst snowfly, Kentucky creekshell, Kirtland’s snake, Kisatchie painted crayfish, knobby ram’s horn, knobby rocksnail, Kral’s yellow-eyed grass, Lagniappe crayfish, Lake Valley pyrg, Landyes pyrg, large-flowered Barbara’s buttons, laurel dace, lean crayfish, Lea’s bog lichen, least crayfish, Lilyshoals elimia, Linda’s roadside skipper, Little Kennedy cave beetle, Little Oecetis longhorn caddisfly, Little Tennessee crayfish, lobed barren strawberry, lobed roachfly, Lockes pyrg, Long Beach seedbox, longhead darter, longitudinal gland pyrg, longnose darter, longsolid, Lost Creek pebblesnail, Louisiana eyed silkmoth, Louisiana needlefly, lowland loosestrife, Maddens cave beetle, magnificent rams-horn, Maiden Spring cave beetle, Mammoth Spring crayfish, Manitou cavesnail, masked duskysnail, meadow joint vetch, median gland Nevada pyrg, Miami cave crayfish, mimic crayfish, minute cave amphipod, minute tryonia, Mississippi flatwoods crayfish, Moapa pebblesnail, Moapa Valley pyrg, Morrison’s cave amphipod, Morse’s little plain brown sedge, Mountain River cruiser, mud elimia, narrow pigtoe, narrowleaf Carolina scalystem, narrowleaf naiad, Natural Bridge cave beetle, nerite pebblesnail, neritiform steptoe ranch pyrg, Neuse River waterdog, New River crayfish, New River Valley cave beetle, Newberry burrowing crayfish, [two species with no common names], nodulose Coosa river snail, northern cavefish, northern red-bellied cooter, northern steptoe pyrg, nugget pebblesnail, obey crayfish, Ocala vetch, Ocmulgee marstonia, Ocmulgee skullcap, Oktibbeha riverlet crayfish, one-toed amphiuma, Orange Lake cave crayfish, orangefin madtom, Orlando cave crayfish, Ouachita burrowing crayfish, Ouachita creekshell, Ouachita madtom, overlooked cave beetle, Ozark chub, Ozark emerald, Ozark pyrg, Ozark shiner, Pahranagat pebblesnail, Palatka skipper, paleback darter, pallid cave crayfish, Panama City crayfish, Panhandle lily, Panhandle meadow beauty, Pascagoula map turtle, patch-nosed salamander, peppered shiner, piebald madtom, Piedmont blue burrower, Pine Island Oryzomys, Point of Rocks tryonia, ponderous siltsnail, popeye shiner, Potem pebblesnail, princess elimia, pristine crayfish, prune elimia, Puget Oregonian, purple balduina, purple Lilliput, purple skimmer, Putnum County cave crayfish, pygmy siltsnail, pyramid pigtoe, rabbitsfoot, rare skipper, raven’s seedbox, rayed bean, rayed creekshell, regal burrowing crayfish, reverse pebblesnail, rivergrass, robust redhorse, rockcastle wood aster, rocky shiner, Rogue Creek hydroptila caddisfly, rough-stemmed aster, round ebonyshell, round hickorynut, round-rib elimia, Rye Cove isopod, saddled madtom, Saint Paul cave beetle, salamander mussel, saline burrowing crayfish, Sanibel Island Oryzomys, Santa Fe cave crayfish, Sarah’s hydroptila caddisfly, Savannah Lilliput, Say’s spiketail, seaside alder, seepage salamander, Septima’s clubtail, setose cream and brown mottled microcaddisfly, Sevier snowfly, Sharp’s leafy liverwort, Shasta chaparral, Shasta Hesperian, Shasta sideband, Shasta Springs pebblesnail, Shawnee darter, Sheepnose, Shelta cave crayfish, Sherman’s short-tailed shrew, Shinner’s sunflower, shortspire hornsnail, Shutispear crayfish, sickle darter, sicklefin redhorse, silken cave beetle, Silver Glen Springs crayfish, Siskiyou sideband, skirted hornsnail, slenderclaw crayfish, slenderwrist burrowing crayfish, small-flower meadow beauty, small-headed pipewort, smallscale darter, Smokies needlefly, Smokies snowfly, smooth mudalia, smooth-barked St. John’s wort, snuffbox, South Branch Valley cave beetle, South Florida rainbow snake, Southeast Nevada pyrg, southern Duckwater pyrg, southern elktoe, southern kidneyshell, southern lance, southern meadowrue, southern racemose goldenrod, southern sandshell, southern snaketail, southern steptoe pyrg, spathulate seedbox, speckled burrowing crayfish, spectaclecase, spider cave crayfish, spider elimia, spiny riversnail, spiny scale crayfish, spinytail crayfish, sporting-goods tryonia, spotted darter, spotted rocksnail, Spring Mountains pyrg , St. John’s elephantear, Sterile Basin pyrg, striated darter, sub-globose snake pyrg, sub-globose Steptoe Ranch pyrg , Sucarnoochee River crayfish, sun-facing coneflower, Suwannee moccasinshell, swamp buckthorn, Sykora’s hydroptila caddisfly, tall pebblesnail, Tallapoosa orb, tapered pigtoe, Tehamana chaparral, Tennessee cave crayfish, Tennessee clubshell, Tennessee clubtail, Tennessee forestfly, Tennessee heelsplitter, Tennessee pigtoe, Tennessee pondweed, Texas emerald, Texas screwstem, Texas trillium, thin-wall quillwort, Thomas’ cave beetle, Thorne’s beakrush, three-tooth triaenodes caddisfly, tidewater amphipod, Tombigbee Riverlet crayfish, trispot darter, Tuscumbia darter, umbilicate pebblesnail, variable-leaved Indian plantain, Virginia stone, Waccamaw fatmucket, walnut elimia, Warrior darter, Warrior pigtoe, water stitchwort, Wekiwa hydrobe snail, Wekiwa siltsnail, West Florida cow lily, western chicken turtle, western fanshell, Westfall’s clubtail, West’s flax, Wherry’s sweet pitcherplant, White River Valley pyrg, winter quillwort, Wintu sideband, wire-leaved dropseed, Woodville Karst cave crayfish, Yadkin River goldenrod, Yalobusha Riverlet crayfish, Yazoo crayfish, yellow anisetree, yellow lance, yellow-sided clubtail.

Listing Proposal: California golden trout, Lake Sammamish kokanee salmon, black-footed albatross, cactus ferruginous pygmy owl, western gull-billed tern, dusky tree vole, Alabama pearlshell, Choctaw bean, coquí llanero, fuzzy pigtoe, Mohave ground squirrel, Mojave fringe-toed lizard, narrow pigtoe, Oklahoma grass pink, Ozark chinquapin, round ebonyshell, San Bernardino springsnail, southern kidneyshell, southern sandshell, tapered pigtoe, Tehachapi slender salamander, Three Forks springsnail, 23 species from Oahu. 

Final Decision: Ozark hellbender, rush darter, yellowcheek darter, Casey’s june beetle, Altamaha spinymussel, chucky madtom, Cumberland darter, DeBeque phacelia, laurel dace, Pagosa skyrocket, parachute penstemon.

 

2012
Initial Decision: Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper (’i’iwi), San Bernardino flying squirrel, white-tailed ptarmigan, Bartram stonecrop, beardless chinch weed, Bicknell’s thrush, Sonoran talussnail.

Listing Proposal: Mexican gray wolf, Gunnison sage grouse, spring pygmy sunfish, streaked horned lark, Jemez Mountain salamander, Jollyville Plateau salamander, Miami blue butterfly, Austin blind salamander, coral pink sand dunes tiger beetle, Florida semaphore cactus, Georgetown salamander, Hat Creek pebblesnail, aboriginal prickly apple, Acuna cactus, basalt juga, Big Warm Spring pyrg, brush prairie pocket gopher, canary duskysnail, Cape Sable thoroughwort, cinnamon juga, Columbia duskysnail, diamond darter, Diamond Y spring snail, diminutive amphipod, diminutive pebblesnail, Duckwater pyrg, Duckwater Warm Springs pyrg, Fickeisen Plains cactus, Florida bonneted bat, fluted kidneyshell, Gierisch mallow, Gonzales springsnail, Goose Valley pebblesnail, grotto sculpin, knobby ram’s horn, Lemmon’s fleabane, lesser prairie chicken, Locke’s pyrg, Mardon skipper butterfly, masked duskysnail, Mt. Charleston blue butterfly, Neosho mucket, nerite pebblesnail, nugget pebblesnail, Olympia pocket gopher, Olympic pocket gopher, Phantom Lake cave snail, Phantom springsnail, Potem pebblesnail, rabbitsfoot, rayed bean, Roy Prairie pocket gopher, Salado salamander, Shasta Springs pebblesnail, sheepnose mussel, Shelton pocket gopher, slabside pearlymussel, southern Duckwater pyrg, snuffbox, spectaclecase pearly mussel, Tacoma pocket gopher, tall pebblesnail, Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly, Tenino pocket gopher, Umtanum desert buckwheat, Wekiu bug, White Bluffs bladderpod, Yelm pocket gopher, 21 species from the Big Island (Hawaii) and 29 species from Maui (Hawaii).

Final Decision (if proposed): Cactus ferruginous pygmy owl, Alabama pearlshell, Choctaw bean, fuzzy pigtoe, narrow pigtoe, round ebonyshell, San Bernardino springsnail, southern kidneyshell, southern sandshell, tapered pigtoe, Three Forks springsnail, and 23 species from Oahu, Hawaii.

 

2013
Listing Proposal: American wolverine, Mono Basin sage grouse, Oregon spotted frog, red knot, Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, western yellow-billed cuckoo, Yosemite toad, ashy storm petrel, Dakota skipper, eastern small-footed bat, Kittlitz’s murrelet, Mexican garter snake, northern long-eared bat, Rosemont talussnail.

Final Decision (if proposed): Mexican gray wolf, Miami blue butterfly, Gunnison sage grouse, Jemez Mountain salamander, Austin blind salamander, Georgetown salamander, spring pygmy sunfish, streaked horned lark, Florida semaphore cactus, Coral Pink Sand Dunes tiger beetle, Aboriginal prickly-apple, Acuna cactus, Brush prairie pocket gopher, Cape Sable thoroughwort, Diamond darter, Diamond Y spring snail, Diminutive amphipod, Fickeisen plains, Florida bonneted bat, Fluted kidneyshell, Gierisch mallow, Gonzales springsnail, grotto sculpin, Jollyville Plateau salamander, Lemmon’s fleabane, lesser prairie chicken, Mardon skipper butterfly, Mt. Charleston blue butterfly, Neosho mucket, Olympia pocket gopher, Olympic pocket gopher, Phantom Lake cave snail, Phantom springsnail, rabbitsfoot, rayed bean, Roy Prairie pocket gopher, Salado salamander, sheepnose mussel, Shelton pocket gopher, slabside pearlymussel, snuffbox, spectaclecase pearly mussel, Tacoma pocket gopher, Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly, Tenino pocket gopher, Umtanum desert buckwheat, Wekiu bug, White Bluffs bladderpod, Yelm pocket gopher, and 21 species from the Big Island (Hawaii) and 29 species from Maui (Hawaii).

 

2014
Listing Proposal: Pacific fisher, Rio Grande cutthroat trout, yellow-billed loon, Montana grayling, black pine snake, least chub, Tucson shovel-nosed snake, and five other candidates.

Final Decision (if proposed): American wolverine, Mono Basin sage grouse, Oregon spotted frog, red knot, Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, western yellow-billed cuckoo, Yosemite toad, ashy storm petrel, Dakota skipper, eastern small-footed bat, Kittlitz’s murrelet, Mexican garter snake, northern long-eared bat, Rosemont talussnail.

 

2015
Listing Proposal: New England cottontail rabbit, Columbia Basin greater sage grouse, greater sage grouse, eastern massasauga rattlesnake, headwater chub, Kentucky arrow darter, Lower Colorado River roundtail chub, Sonoran desert tortoise, Southern Idaho ground squirrel, and 35 other candidate species. 

Final Decision (if proposed): Pacific fisher, Rio Grande cutthroat trout, yellow-billed loon, Montana grayling, black pine snake, least chub, Tucson shovel-nosed snake and five other candidates.

 

2016
Listing Proposal: Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper (’i’iwi), relict leopard frog, Tahoe yellow cress. 
 
Final Decision (if proposed): Greater sage grouse, Columbia Basin greater sage grouse, New England cottontail rabbit, eastern massasauga rattlesnake, headwater chub, Kentucky arrow darter, Lower Colorado River roundtail chub, Sonoran desert tortoise, Southern Idaho ground squirrel, and 35 other candidate species. 

 

2017
Listing Proposal: Pacific walrus. 

Final Decision (if proposed): Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper (’i’iwi), relict leopard frog, Tahoe yellow cress.

 

2018
Final Decision (if proposed): Pacific walrus. 

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Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper banner photo by C.R. Kohley, courtesy of the State of Hawaii Division of Forestry and Wildlife's Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project