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Court Settlement Provides Hope for Mexican Gray Wolves

Forty Years After Endangered Species Act Protection, Government to Prepare Recovery Plan

TUCSON, Ariz.— The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today issued its final analysis of the effects of the proposed Rosemont Mine on threatened and endangered species in the area. The formal document, called a “biological opinion,” gives approval to the mine despite admitting that it will destroy the home of America’s only known jaguar, nicknamed “El Jefe” by Tucson schoolchildren, and harm a number of other imperiled species. The Rosemont copper mine would blast a mile-wide, 3,000-foot-deep open pit in the heart of El Jefe’s home territory near Tucson and bury thousands of acres of surrounding public land with billions of tons of toxic mine waste.

“The agency charged with protecting America’s most vulnerable wildlife thinks it’s just fine for a foreign mining company to harm our only known jaguar,” said Randy Serraglio, conservation advocate with the Center for Biological Diversity. “This outrageous decision, which was contradicted by the agency’s own scientists, will not withstand judicial scrutiny.”

The Rosemont biological opinion has gone through multiple iterations. It was first released more than two years ago and then retracted. The conclusions regarding the jaguar in the final document released today remain largely the same as in the previous version. Documents obtained by the Center through the Freedom of Information Act showed that, in four different drafts of the previous document, agency scientists concluded that the mine would cause unacceptable harm to the jaguar, but their conclusions were reversed at higher levels of the agency.

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Learn more about saving jaguars.

Contact: Randy Serraglio

LATEST 10 PRESS RELEASES

May 3, 2016 – Federal Wildlife Agency Gives Approval to Harm America’s Only Known Jaguar

May 3, 2016 – EPA Finds Atrazine Likely Harming Most Species of Plants, Animals in U.S.

May 2, 2016 – EPA Uses Industry-funded Studies to Determine Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer

April 29, 2016 – Forest Service Approves Habitat Destruction in Sierra Nevada Roadless Area

April 28, 2016 – Win for Wildlife: Court Rules Against Unrestricted Motorized Travel in Santa Fe National Forest

April 27, 2016 – Lawsuit Launched to Fight Dangerous Sulfur, Nitrogen Pollution

April 26, 2016 – Mendocino County to Perform Environmental Study on Lethal Animal Program

April 26, 2016 – Court Settlement Provides Hope for Mexican Gray Wolves

April 26, 2016 – New Report: Rooftop Solar Power Blocked by Sunny States With Bad Policy

April 25, 2016 – Obama Administration Denies Critical Habitat Protections to Northern Long-eared Bats

 

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Media Contacts:
Mike Stark, Communications Director
mstark@biologicaldiversity.org, (520) 623-5252, ext. 315

Jessica Herrera, Media Specialist – Population and Sustainability
jherrera@biologicaldiversity.org, (520) 260-17256

Steve Jones, Media Specialist – Oceans
sjones@biologicaldiversity.org, (415) 305-3866

Andy Parker, Media Specialist – Endangered Species
aparker@biologicaldiversity.org, (503) 310-5569

Patrick Sullivan, Media Specialist – Climate Change, Fracking
psullivan@biologicaldiversity.org, (415) 632-5316

Tom Brown, Media Specialist – Public Lands
tbrown@biologicaldiversity.org, (520) 623-5252 ext. 326

Russ McSpadden, Communications Associate – Media Photos
rmcspadden@biologicaldiversity.org

Banner photo Center for Biological Diversity; Mexican gray wolf photo by Robin Silver, Center for BIological Diversity