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SAVING THE SOUTHWESTERN WILLOW FLYCATCHER

One of the first imperiled animals the Center championed, the southwestern willow flycatcher has suffered more than a century of steady decline. Livestock grazing, dams, water withdrawal, and sprawl have robbed the sentinel-like songbird of more than 90 percent of its riparian habitat — and left it all the more vulnerable to other birds that prey on its eggs or use its nests to incubate their own eggs. After a Center petition and years of legal wrangling, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finally declared the flycatcher endangered in 1995, but it’s been plagued with administration disregard ever since.

As destruction of southwestern streamside forests continues, the Center is taking concrete action to win adequate protections for flycatcher habitat. In 2008, we sued over a politically motivated Bush-era decision that reduced the bird’s protected habitat by more than two-thirds of the area originally proposed after a Center lawsuit — and in January 2013, the Obama administration protected more than 200,000 acres along 1,227 miles of river. In 2009, we went to court over a plan allowing an imported tamarisk leaf-eating beetle to seriously harm flycatcher habitat in southern Utah and northern Arizona. Simultaneously, we’re defending flycatcher habitat along Arizona’s San Pedro River from unsustainable groundwater pumping, off-road vehicle destruction and other ecosystem threats.

Since the flycatcher’s listing, the Center has won an injunction protecting a critical flycatcher population at Lake Isabella, California; convinced the U.S. Forest Service to remove cattle from rivers in Arizona and New Mexico; produced a pivotal report on the bird’s status; and helped develop a federal recovery plan. In 1996, we sued the Bureau of Reclamation for not analyzing the effects of enlarging Arizona’s Roosevelt Dam, which was to flood out the state’s largest flycatcher population. And in 2000, we reached a landmark settlement with the Forest Service to protect 50 endangered species — including the flycatcher — in Southern California’s four national forests.

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KEY DOCUMENTS
2013 Critical habitat designation
2008 Notice of intent to sue over imported beetle threat
1995 Federal Endangered Species Act listing
1992 Federal listing petition

ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROFILE

ACTION TIMELINE

NATURAL HISTORY

MEDIA
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Search our newsroom for the southwestern willow flycatcher

RELATED ISSUES
Golden State Biodiversity Initiative
Borderlands and Boundary Waters
Southern California Forests
Rivers
Save the Virgin River 
San Pedro River
The Endangered Species Act

DETRITUS
Download a southwestern willow flycatcher ringtone for your cell phone

Contact: Kierán Suckling

Photo by Suzanne Langridge, USGS