Urgent: We Just Sued to Save Starving Orcas

Cyanide is imperiling salmon, trout and orcas.
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Orcas

Hi Everyaction,

Just 73 Southern Resident killer whales remain.

Yet Washington state permits cyanide pollution at levels that harm the Chinook salmon that orcas depend on — and the Environmental Protection Agency allows it.

So we went to court to stop it.

Please give today to the Saving Life on Earth Fund to help our fights for ocean wildlife.

For years the EPA has condoned the discharge of toxic cyanide in Washington state from numerous industrial sources at dangerous levels.

But the latest science shows — and the National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agree — that Washington's cyanide pollution limits put Chinook and coho salmon, as well as bull trout, at risk.

This in turn hurts endangered orcas, who are already starving because their Chinook salmon food supply is vanishing.

By failing to cap the amount of cyanide in the water — and by not even being able to meaningfully monitor how much is being discharged in the first place — the EPA has violated the Endangered Species Act.

Orcas and other marine wildlife are fighting for their survival. We can't let a federal agency put endangered species at greater risk.

The extinction crisis demands we act with urgency to save endangered species. Just as manatees in Florida are starving because their watery home is so polluted, so too are orcas and salmon being pushed to the brink by toxics.

Extinction is a choice. To prevent it, business-as-usual practices allowing the poisoning of critical habitat must be ended immediately.

We’re going all out to save wildlife wherever they are in danger. Each and every orca is precious, and we must do all we can to save them.

Please help with a donation to the Saving Life on Earth Fund.

For the wild,

Kierán Suckling

Kierán Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity

 

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Photo of orcas from NOAA.
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Center for Biological Diversity
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