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CENTER for BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY Because life is good
ABOUT ACTION PROGRAMS SPECIES NEWSROOM PUBLICATIONS SUPPORT

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ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROFILE

PROTECTION STATUS: Endangered

YEAR LISTED: 1998

CRITICAL HABITAT: 836 miles of stream in Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska designated in 2004

RECOVERY PLAN: None

RANGE: The Kansas and Cottonwood river basins in Kansas; the Missouri, Grand, Lamine, Chariton, and Des Moines river basins in Missouri; the North Raccoon and Rock river basins in Iowa; the James, Big Sioux, and Vermillion river watersheds in South Dakota; the Rock and Big Sioux river watersheds in Minnesota; and two streams in Nebraska

THREATS: Habitat destruction, degradation, and fragmentation from siltation, reduced water quality, tributary impoundment, stream channelization, and stream dewatering; as well as predation by nonnative fish

POPULATION TREND: The number of known Topeka shiner populations has been reduced by approximately 80 percent, with approximately 50 percent of this decline occurring within the last 25 years. The species now primarily exists as isolated and fragmented populations.

Photo by Konrad Schmidt, Minnesota Department Of Natural Resources