No. 352, September 20, 2004

SPECTACULAR GREAT LAKES DRAGONFLY TO BE PROTECTED

   

UTAH STATE FISH HEADED TO COURT

   

MASSIVE ARIZONA LAND TRADE CHALLENGED BY ENVIRONMENTALISTS AND NATIVE AMERICANS

   

LAST RARE SEA TURTLE DIES IN NORTHERN MEXICO

   

LAST DITCH EFFORT TARGETS HAWAIIAN FOREST BIRD

 

Tell your friends about the Center for Biological Diversity's Email Newsletter!
Click here...


and support the Center's work
Click now

To view past newsletters.

If you received this message from a friend, you can sign up for Endangered Earth Online.

 

   

SPECTACULAR GREAT LAKES DRAGONFLY TO BE PROTECTED

In response to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity and other conservationists, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to designate and protect critical habitat for the spectacular Hine’s emerald dragonfly. The brilliant green-eyed dragonfly is dependent upon healthy wetlands and is threatened by urban sprawl, agricultural development, toxic pollution, logging, water diversions, off-road vehicles, vacation home development and road & pipeline construction. Formerly widespread, it has been reduced to small populations in Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Missouri. It is extinct in Ohio, Indiana and Alabama.

Lacking a clear identification of the species' most essential habitat, the Fish and Wildlife Service has not formally reviewed a single habitat destruction proposal on the species' behalf since it was placed on the endangered species list in 1995. During that time thousands of acres of wetlands have been destroyed and degraded. The agency will publish a proposed designation on July 7, 2006 and final rule on May 7, 2007.

Data presented to Congress by the Fish and Wildlife Service shows that species with critical habitat are recovering twice as fast as those without it. Nonetheless, the Bush administration bizarrely asserts that critical habitat does not benefit imperiled species.

For more information and photos of this beautiful species.


UTAH STATE FISH HEADED TO COURT

On 9-8-04, the Center for Biological Diversity, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, Biodiversity Conservation Alliance, and the Pacific Rivers Council notified the Bush administration that it will soon file suit over the administration's refusal to protect the Bonneville cutthroat trout under the Endangered Species Act. Logging, cattle grazing, pollution, mining, water pumping and exotic trout have eliminated Utah's state fish from 90 percent of its historic range.

The Bush administration has placed only 31 species on the endangered list, compared to 394 species protected during the Clinton administration's first term and 234 during the first Bush presidency. The administration has denied the safety net of the Endangered Species Act to more species (45) than it has protected.


MASSIVE ARIZONA LAND TRADE CHALLENGED BY ENVIRONMENTALISTS AND NATIVE AMERICANS

The Western Mining Action Project, the Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club, Western Land Exchange Project, and San Carlos Apache Tribe have filed formal protests opposing the transfer of 16,297 acres of federal land in southern Arizona to the Phelps Dodge mining company. In exchange for BLM lands worth billions to its mining operation, the corporation will hand over just 3,867 acres of private land valued at $5.2 million. And the value of those lands has been vastly inflated to justify the deal. The land valuation was conducted by a private contractor paid for by Phelps Dodge.

LAST RARE SEA TURTLE DIES IN NORTHERN MEXICO

The lone survivor of 52 Olive Ridley sea turtle eggs found near Guaymas, Mexico died this week despite efforts by fishermen, conservationists, and the Mexican government to protect it. The endangered Olive Ridley sea turtle rarely nests as far north as the northern Gulf of California, so the discovery of 52 eggs in August set off an around-the-clock effort to protect them from predators and human disturbance. Though an immediate loss for the species, the effort reaffirmed the importance of sea turtle preservation in Mexico.


LAST DITCH EFFORT TARGETS HAWAIIAN FOREST BIRD

Discovered just 31 years ago, the Po'ouli may be the world's most endangered species: only three birds exist. This September the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service captured the lone remaining female and hopes to soon capture the last two males for a last-ditch captive breeding effort. The secretive Po'ouli inhabits Hawaii's densest rainforests where it lives on native snails. Hundreds of Hawaiian snails have already gone extinct due to habitat loss, pesticide spraying, and invasion of exotic species.


Click now and become a member of the Center for Biological Diversity, and ensure a future for wildlife and habitat.


Center for Biological Diversity | PO Box 710 Tucson, AZ 85702 | 520-623-5252 | center@biologicaldiversity.org

This message was sent to . Visit your subscription management page to modify your email communication preferences or update your personal profile. To stop ALL email from Center for Biological Diversity - Biodiversity Activist, click to remove yourself from our lists (or reply via email with "remove or unsubscribe" in the subject line).