From: Kieran Suckling [ksuckling@biologicaldiversity.org]
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2000 5:49 PM
To: Recipient list suppressed
Subject: BIODIVERSITY ACTIVIST #257
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             CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

           <www.biologicaldiversity.org>      10-20-00      #257
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§ SUIT CHALLENGES GRAZING ON 1.8 MILLION ACRES IN AZ & NM

§ 518,000 ACRES PROTECTED FOR GNATCATCHER & SHRIMP

§ SUIT FILED TO PROTECT COLORADO RIVER CUTTHROAT TROUT

§ ENVIROS & NATIVE AMERICANS CHALLENGE CELL TOWER ON
   SACRED ARIZONA MOUNTAIN

§ WOLF KILLER GETS FOUR MONTHS IN JAIL

§ SEND A FREE INTERNET FAX TO SAVE WETLANDS AND
   ENDANGERED SPECIES...UNIVERSITIES ARE FOR EDUCATION,
   NOT EXTINCTION

§ B.B. KING & LOS LOBOS TO PLAY BENEFIT FOR CENTER THIS
   SATURDAY

SUIT CHALLENGES GRAZING ON 1.8 MILLION ACRES OF NATIONAL
FOREST IN ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO
On 10-20-00, the Center for Biological Diversity filed suit against 89
livestock grazing allotments on five national forests in the Gila River
Basin in southern Arizona and New Mexico. Although nearly 900 miles of
rivers running through these allotments has been designated as “critical
habitat” for two threatened fish (the loach minnow and spikedace), the
Forest Service has refused to review the impacts of livestock grazing on
the streams. Livestock grazing is a primary cause of the decline of both
species. Cattle eradicate the riparian trees which shade the streams,
chew down the grasses which stabilize the soil, trample the stream
banks, defecate in the water, and cause erosion to fill in fish feeding and
spawning areas.

The Center has been in litigation since 1993 to designate critical habitat
for the loach minnow and spikedace, list them as endangered species,
and protect their habitat from livestock, logging, exotic species
introductions, water diversions, and stream bank channelization. The
result has been designation of 900 miles of critical habitat, reduced
logging in the headwaters of the Gila River, removal of cattle from
hundreds of miles of public streams, a legal ruling against the Central
Arizona Project, and a new lease on life for two of the Southwest’s most
unique, and beautiful fish.

The Center is being represented by Marty Bergoffen.

To see maps of grazing allotments and critical habitat for the loach
minnow and spikedace:
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/grazing/lmsd_suit.html>
     ______________

518,000 ACRES PROTECTED FOR GNATCATCHER FAIRY SHRIMP
On 10-17-00, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated 518,000
acres of "critical habitat" of southern California coastal sage scrub and
vernal pool wetlands for the endangered California gnatcatcher and San
Diego fairy shrimp. The decision is likely to place sweeping limits on
developments which would destroy open space and wetlands.

The San Diego fairy shrimp designation came in response to a petition
and two lawsuits by the Center for Biological Diversity. The California
gnatcatcher designation came in response to a lawsuit by the Natural
Resources Defense Council, and listing petitions submitted by NRDC
and Dave Hogan of the Center for Biological Diversity.

In a move to mollify developers and the Marine Corps, the Service
excluded roughly 327,000 acres previously identified as essential for the
recovery of the two species. The exclusion of Marine Corps bases Camp
Pendleton and Miramar was the result of a back room deal cut by the
notorious anti-endangered species Service bureaucrat Michael Spear.

To mollify developers and the powerful City of San Diego, the
designation also arbitrarily excluded all habitat within the area covered by
the San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program. The Service
justifies the exclusion by saying the program itself provides sufficient
protection for the pools and endangered wetland species. In 1997,
however, the agency's own biologists concluded just the opposite.
Indeed, they refused to certify the program for endangered wetland
species protection.

For more information on the Center’s Golden State Biodiversity Initiative:
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/goldenstate/goldenstate.html>
     ______________

SUIT FILED TO PROTECT COLORADO RIVER CUTTHROAT TROUT
On 10-17-00, the Center for Biological Diversity, Biodiversity Associates,
the Biodiversity Legal Foundation, Colorado Wild, and the Center for
Native Ecosystems filed suit against the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to
list the Colorado River cutthroat trout as an endangered species. The
Service has refused to process a petition to list the trout under the
Endangered Species Act even though it has declined throughout its
range do to logging, livestock grazing, exotic species and incursion of
roads into roadless areas.

One of the most spectacular of the West’s many cutthroat trout, the
Colorado River cutthroat has a crimson belly and distinct black spots
covering the tail, sides and back. It use to inhabit all cold-water streams
of the Colorado River drainage, including portions of Wyoming, Colorado,
Utah, and extreme northern New Mexico and Arizona. It has been
reduced to less than five percent of its historic range. extinction.

The Center also petitioned and is litigating to list the Rio Grande cutthroat
trout – the New Mexico state fish – as an endangered species.

To see the Colorado River cutthroat trout petition:
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/papers/CRCTintro.html>
     ________________

ENVIROS & NATIVE AMERICANS CHALLENGE CELL TOWERS ON
SACRED ARIZONA MOUNTAIN
On 10-19-00, the Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club Grand
Canyon Chapter, and members of the Navajo, Hualapai, and Hopi Indian
tribes appealed the Coconino National Forest's decision to allow Cellular
One to construct a communication tower on the San Francisco
Peaks.  Called Dook'oo'osliid by the Navajos, the Peaks are of cultural
and religious importance to at least 13 tribes in the Southwest, and
activists are currently attempting to have the entire mountain designated
as a "Traditional Cultural Property" under the National Historic
Preservation Act.

Despite the importance of the Peaks to Native Americans, the U.S.
Forest Service did not adequately consult with tribal representatives or
accurately explain the visual impact which the proposed tower would
have on the area.  Additionally, the Forest Service failed to address the
alarming levels of bird mortality which are caused by communication
towers.  It is estimated that in the U.S. alone, over 5 million birds a year,
most of them nocturnal migrants, die after colliding with towers or
becoming disoriented by their lighting.  The exponential growth of the
cellular and digital communications industries has resulted in
approximately 5,000 new towers being built each year, with the number
expected to increase in the next decade.  With over 77,000
communications towers already existing in the U.S. and industry pushing
hard to build thousands more on federal land, it is imperative that the
Forest Service and other agencies act now to address this impending
crisis.
     ____________

WOLF KILLER GETS FOUR MONTHS JAIL TIME
On 10-20-00, James Michael Rogers of Queen Creek, Arizona was
sentenced to four months imprisonment, six months house arrest, and
three years of supervised probation for shooting an endangered Mexican
gray wolf. The wolf was killed on 10-18-98 near Nutrioso, AZ and was
transported to NM in an attempt to cover up the killing.

In addition to Rogers, who hails from a public lands ranching family, a
minor was also apprehended in the killing. It is not known what happened
to him.
     ______________

SEND A FREE, AUTOMATIC INTERNET FAX TO SAVE WETLANDS
AND ENDANGERED SPECIES...UNIVERSITIES ARE FOR
EDUCATION, NOT EXTINCTION
The University of California plans to build an enormous new campus,
complete with a “supporting community,” new highways, and massive
sprawl, in the largest remaining vernal pool complex in California.  The
site, located outside the city of Merced, was selected in a poorly-publicized,
poorly conducted process which inexplicably rejected less
environmentally sensitive areas. The proposed site is home to at least
seven endangered species including the Conservancy Fairy Shrimp
(Branchinecta conservatio) and Vernal Pool Tadpole Shrimp (Lepidurus
packardi).  The Center for Biological Diversity is working with a coalition
to convince the university to relocate its proposed campus to a less
environmentally destructive location. 

Please use our automated system to SEND A FAX to Governor Gray Davis
today. Ask him to withdraw his support from the proposed U.S. Merced
site. JUST CLICK HERE
<http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/protect_vernal_pools_fax>

Suggested comments are pre-written in the send box, however we
strongly recommend that you personalize the comments before sending.

For more information on this project, the species that occur at the site,
and what you can do to help: <http://www.vernalpools.org>
     _____________________

B.B. KING & LOS LOBOS TO PLAY BENEFIT FOR CENTER
B.B. King, Los Lobos, Merl Saunders and the Rainforest Band, and Walt
Richardson will perform at the Sedona EcoFest 2000 in a benefit for the
Center for Biological Diversity, Save Long Canyon, The Nature
Conservancy, The Resource Center for Environmental Education, and
The Humane Society of Sedona.

The EcoFest is on Saturday, October 21, 2000, in the Georgia Frontiere
Performing Arts Pavilion at The Sedona Cultural Park, Sedona, AZ. In
addition to music, it will have educational booths.

General Admission Lawn tickets are $40.00. Children five and under
admitted free. To order tickets call (520) 203- 4TIX (4849) or (800) 780-
ARTS (2787) nationwide. For more information
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/events/ecofest.html>
_____________________________________________________________

ENDANGERED TOTEMS. Eleven of the twelve western states have adopted imperiled species as their state fish: New Mexico (Rio Grande cutthroat trout), Arizona (Apache trout), Colorado (Greenback cutthroat trout), Utah (Bonneville cutthroat trout), Nevada (Lahontan cutthroat trout), California (Golden trout), Oregon (Chinook salmon), Washington (Steelhead trout), Idaho, Montana and Wyoming (Cutthroat trout).

Kierán Suckling                           ksuckling@biologicaldiversity.org
Science and Policy Director          520.623.5252 phone
Center for Biological Diversity        520.623.9797 fax
<www.biologicaldiversity.org>        POB 710, Tucson, AZ 85702-0710