Subject: FW: BIODIVERSITY ACTIVIST #252


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              CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

            <www.biologicaldiversity.org>      9-19-00      #252
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§ SANTA BARBARA TIGER SALAMANDER LISTED AS ENDANGERED

§ PETITION FILED TO PROTECT PACIFIC POCKET MOUSE HABITAT

§ SUIT TO CHALLENGE DEVELOPMENT TO SAVE IMPERILED
    FROGS, KIT FOX, SALAMANDER, AND FAIRY SHRIMP

§ 16 CONDORS TREATED FOR LEAD POISONING, RELEASED


SANTA BARBARA TIGER SALAMANDER LISTED AS ENDANGERED
The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has issued a final rule listing the Santa
Barbara population of the California tiger salamander as an endangered
species. It was temporarily listed on an emergency basis on 1-19-00 in
response to a lawsuit by the Center for Biological Diversity.

The Santa Barbara tiger salamander has been pushed to the brink of
extinction by destruction of vernal pools, grasslands, oak woodlands, and
coastal scrub. Urban sprawl, agribusiness clearing, and agricultural
pollution runoff are the main threats. Of the 14 remaining breeding sites
in the county, half have been destroyed or have suffered severe
degradation in the last 24 months.

The Center was represented by Brendan Cummings and Sharon Duggan
of Berkeley, California.
      ___________

PETITION FILED TO PROTECT POCKET MOUSE HABITAT
The Center for Biological Diversity, the Endangered Habitats League and
the Natural Resources Defense Council petitioned the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service on 9-19-00 to map out and protect  "critical habitat" areas
for the endangered Pacific pocket mouse.

The Pacific pocket mouse is one of the most endangered mammals in
North America. Despite its listing as an endangered species in
September, 1994, however, little habitat protection has been provided
and plans are proceeding destroy even more through the construction of
the massive Foothills South Tollroad. The tollroad would pass through
essential pocket mouse habitat on the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps
base. The petition requests that the base and other areas in Orange and
San Diego counties be designated and protected as critical habitat.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife declined to designate critical habitat for the
Pacific pocket mouse in 1994, arguing that such a designation is not
effective on private lands, and that it could harm the mouse by publicly
revealing its location. Conditions have since changed with the discovery
of two pocket mouse populations on Camp Pendleton. Additionally, the
destruction of mouse habitat by the tollroad on private land will require
federal permits subject to protection of critical habitat.

Previous petitions and suits by the Center have resulted in federal
proposals to designated 7.2 million acres of critical habitat in California
for the Peninsular bighorn sheep, California red-legged frog, Monterey
spineflower, Arroyo southwestern toad, Alameda whipsnake, Bay
checkerspot butterfly, Zayante band-winged grasshopper and other
species.

To learn more, see the petition, and find out which mice species have
visited outer space, check out the Center's Pacific pocket mouse page at:
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/species/pacmouse/pacmouse.html>
       _______________

SUIT TO CHALLENGE DEVELOPMENT TO SAVE IMPERILED FROGS,
KIT FOX, SALAMANDER, AND FAIRY SHRIMP
On 8-19-00, Save Our Danville Creeks, the Center for Biological
Diversity, and the Alameda Creek Alliance filed a formal notice of intent
to sue to halt the Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service to halt the Wendt development project along East Alamo Creek
in Danville, in the East San Francisco Bay Area.

Though the development would impact a seasonal wetland and creeks
inhabited by endangered California red-legged frogs and the California
tiger salamanders, the Army Corps of Engineers issued Shapell
Industries a Clean Water Permit to build 272 houses without requiring a
full environmental assessment and habitat protection measures.

The area has been proposed as critical habitat for the California red-legged
frog and is potential habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox and two species of
vernal pool fairy shrimp. The plaintiffs are represented by Wild
Earth Advocates attorneys Julia Olson of San Francisco and Jamie
Jefferson of Portland.

To learn more about the California red-legged frog:
<http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/species/rlfrog/rlfrog.html>
      ______________

16 CONDORS TREATED FOR LEAD POISONING, RELEASED
Sixteen California condors will be re-released this week following
recapture and treatment for lead poisoning. This past April and May, five
condors died from ingesting lead shot after feeding on carrion near
Grand Canyon National Park. The sixteen recaptured birds had nearly
lethal doses of lead and suffered from extreme weight loss. Lead
poisoning is a major threat to carrion eating birds such as the condor.
_____________________________________________________________

ENDANGERED TOTEMS. Eleven of the twelve western states have adopted
imperiled species as their state fish: New Mexico (Rio Grande cutthroat
trout), Arizona (Apache trout), Colorado (Greenback cutthroat trout), Utah
(Bonneville cutthroat trout), Nevada (Lahontan cutthroat trout), California
(Golden trout), Oregon (Chinook salmon), Washington (Steelhead trout),
Idaho, Montana and Wyoming (Cutthroat trout).

Kierán Suckling                           ksuckling@biologicaldiversity.org
Science and Policy Director          520.623.5252 phone
Center for Biological Diversity        520.623.9797 fax
<www.biologicaldiversity.org>        POB 710, Tucson, AZ 85702-0710

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