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CENTER for BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY Because life is good
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ACTION TIMELINE

May 4, 2004 – The Center and a coalition of allied scientists, artists, and conservationists petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list 225 “candidate” species languishing without Endangered Species Act protection.

March 13, 2008 – The Center petitioned to protect 32 Pacific Northwest mollusks under the Endangered Species Act.

December 14, 2009 – The Center submitted a notice of intent to sue to the Fish and Wildlife Service to end delays in listing 144 species, including the plains bison, the California golden trout and the 32 Northwest snails and slugs we petitioned for in 2008.

February 17, 2010 – The Center filed four lawsuits against the Service over delays in listing 93 species from our December 2009 notice of intent to sue.

March 10, 2010 – In response to our 2004 petition and two lawsuits, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized listing for 48 plants, insects and birds from the island of Kauai, with designation of critical habitat. Many of the species, formerly “candidates” for protection, had been waiting decades for listing.

April 20, 2010 – The Center filed a petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect 404 Southeast aquatic species as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act.

June 16, 2010 – The Center filed a notice of intent to sue the Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to make legally required responses to petitions to protect seven species: the plains bison, striped newt, Berry Cave salamander, Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, Ozark chinquapin, western gull-billed tern and Mohave ground squirrel.

September 13, 2010 – The Center filed a lawsuit challenging the Service’s failure to move forward on protections for three southeastern mussels — the Georgia pigtoe, interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail — that had been waiting more than a decade for protection. On the same day, we filed a motion amend our February suit to cover six additional species: the plains bison, striped newt, berry springs salamander, Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, gull-billed tern and Mohave ground squirrel.

Plains bison photo © Jason Hickey